12 of the World's Most Peaceful and Beautiful Cabins

The best of the best.

In this day and age, who doesn't want to run away and live in a cabin in the woods?

It's a tempting, undeniably romantic idea: to leave the neon rush of the modern world behind for a life lived close to nature, to wake up each morning to birdsong and the smell of woodsmoke, sage, rosemary, and thyme... Ever since Thoreau wrote his Walden, and Justin Vernon created For Emma in a tiny Wisconsin cabin, we've been glamorizing these little wooden shelters to no end, envisioning them as portals out of our busy, chaotic, capitalist reality.

That said, our love of cabins has created a veritable industry in and of itself, generating countless books and providing design inspiration for the most luxurious of NYC apartments and upstate getaways.

While there are millions of lovely cabins in the world, here are 12 particularly beautiful ones, meticulously handpicked to inspire you and fill your heart with peace and the scent of pinecones. Among the criteria that these selections had to fulfill: They have to evoke a feeling of acute nostalgia, they must glow in some way, and they must possess some unique and magical X factor, be it environmental consciousness or architectural brilliance.

Of course, you don't need to buy a night at one of these cabins in order to escape capitalism. If you're feeling impulsive, what do you really have to lose? Let these cabins inspire you to start that woodland retreat of your dreams. After all, we might all have to move into sustainable eco-villages at some point in order to survive and subvert climate change, so we might as well make them aesthetically pleasing.

1. Inverness A-Frame​, California

Tucked away in West Marin, California is the A-frame to end all A-frames. Your wallet will take a hit from a night here, but the place was designed to be a sanctuary from city life, and it was carefully orchestrated to ensure an idyllic retreat. It can hold up to 6 people and can be booked on airbnb today.

2. AI Space Factory Cabin, Upstate New York

AI Space Factory

This cabin is still under construction, but it'll definitely be worth the wait. Created by AI Space Factory (which is also designing homes intended for Mars), not only is this cabin actually 3D printed: It's made of a material stronger than concrete that also happens to be recyclable. It'll be built by the Hudson River, and it's going to be a zero-waste, carbon-neutral structure. It'll be available to rent for one year starting in fall 2020. Then it will be recycled and reprinted in a different location.

3. Mono Cabin

At $22K, this cabin-frame from Drop Structures can be placed anywhere. At 12 feet high and 16 feet across, it's tight quarters—but so is your Brooklyn apartment. Imagine watching the sun rise every morning from within this thing.

4. Cascade Creek Resort, New Zealand

This is technically a chalet, not a cabin, but who's checking? Located in total seclusion among the rolling hills of New Zealand, you can't really ask for much more from a log cabin.

5. The Willow Treehouse, Vermont

This sublimely lovely Vermont cabin is also a treehouse, so it may actually stand a chance for when the oceans and rivers flood due to all the glaciers melting

This house is one of five cabins in the Treehouse Village Inn collection, nestled at the feet of the South Newfane mountain range in Vermont. The property also doubles as a wedding venue and offers access to many secluded rivers, snowy mountains, and other breathtaking vistas that will catapult you away into an alternate universe of peace and soft nature sounds.

6. The Glass House, Candlewood Cabins, Wisconsin

candlewoodcabins.com

These absurdly atmospheric cabins look straight out of a Tumblr nature blog's wildest fantasies, but they're real and open for booking. Wisconsin's Candlewood Cabins is a collection of five secluded wooden homes, located deep in the woods. The standout is definitely the Glass House, with its huge windows that let candescent light pour out into the shadowy surrounding forest. Sadly, this cabin appears to be booked quite literally through 2021, so, if anything, you'll have to live vicariously through photos.


7. Getaway Houses

getaway.house

The company Getaway Houses offers cabins in a multitude of locations, and many are within a day's journey of Brooklyn. At $150 or $175 a night, they're relatively affordable in comparison to many others on this list (why accommodation is so expensive in the first place is another story); plus, they're ultra-modern and stylish, making for the perfect and perfectly minimalist glamping experience. The company also plants a tree every time you book a house, which might not mean anything significant for the environment in the long run, but it's still a nice touch.

Intentionally designed with huge windows and designed to fit into the woods rather than contrast with them, these cabins riff off the Tiny House movement and offer Frank Lloyd Wright-esque architectural stylings, along with the opportunity to spend a night close to the land.

8. Release Wanaka Chalet, New Zealand

newzealand.com

New Zealand knows how to build a good cabin (sorry, chalet). This one takes a little more effort to get to than most of the others on this list, though: Located at 1750 meters above sea level, the Release Wanaka Mountain Top Chalet is just a short helicopter ride away from base camp. Perfect for skiers and hikers, the venue offers unparalleled alpine views.

9. Tintaldra Cabin, Australia 

designboom.com

This cabin is the perfect example of what a futuristic, environmentally synced existence could look like. It's completely off the grid, runs on solar panels, and utilizes rainwater tanks and a wood-burning stove to minimize its footprint on the landscape. Designed by Modscape, it's proof that people can design homes that work in tandem with the land instead of trying to dominate and counteract its life-giving influence.

10. Bonnie Bell Cabin, Colorado

bonniebellcabin.com

Located in the heart of the San Juan Mountains in backcountry Colorado, this dreamy cabin is absurdly pricey—you might be better off camping nearby—but it does look incredibly magical against that wide-open galaxy. Let's all gaze in awe and think about a posthuman future wherein humans live in harmony with the planet, take only what we need and give as much as we take instead of relentlessly trying to destroy the natural world and all of our futures.

bonniebellcabin.combonniebellcabin.com

12. Shipwreck Lodge Cabins, Namibia

dezeen.com

Ever heard of the post-apocalyptic sublime? If there ever was a place that embodied that concept, it might be these cabins, inspired by the hundreds of shipwrecks found off the Atlantic coast of Namibia. Called the Skeleton Coast, this bleached stretch of land is home to a variety of animals such as hyenas, giraffes, and lions. Each cabin is designed with sustainability and ecological harmony in mind, so you can take comfort in knowing that although the ships that inspired them didn't make it very long, these lodgings just might last the test of time.

BONUS: A45, Upstate New York

This cabin, designed by the architecture firm BIG, riffs on the typical A-frame and acts as a mirror and a window to the trees. Inspired by concepts of Nordic minimalism and coziness, the house overlooks a seemingly endless stretch of forest, and it's the perfect place to contemplate the inevitable ephemerality of the human race, or whatever you do to chill out.

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What I Learned as an American Living in London During the COVID-19 Pandemic

Even subtle cultural differences change how a country handles crisis.

On March 3rd, 2020, I left New York City to go spend three months in London with my longtime partner.

You likely recognize that date as shockingly close to when all hell broke loose around the world thanks to the COVID-19 pandemic. As I was leaving NYC, there were already stirrings of unease surrounding a mysterious new virus that was making its way from China to the States, but very few people thought it would be anything but a passing inconvenience.

As it turned out, I likely already had the virus when I departed New York. I began running a fever the day I arrived in London. Still, I figured I had probably just caught a cold on the plane (this was before we knew what we know now, that the coronavirus was already extremely prevalent in NYC by March 3rd), and there was no way of knowing for sure, because tests were only available to people in the hospital with COVID symptoms. Soon, my partner also came down with symptoms.

As we recovered (we were both lucky to have relatively mild cases that lasted only a couple of days), we watched London slowly close down around us. First, theaters and public venues began to close, then office workers were told to stay home. Throughout it all, there was a reigning sense of calm and acceptance among the British people, even as the rest of the world began to panic.

BBC.com

The complaints I heard from British friends and acquaintances were never about the lockdown measures, but rather about the conservative government's hesitance to take more drastic steps and the lack of clarity surrounding what they expected the population to do to prevent the spread of the virus.

Still, I was struck by the difference in tone that I saw on my social media from American friends discussing the pandemic and the calm acceptance of the British people around me. Every post by an American discussing the pandemic used the word "I" over and over again and had a generally panicky tone. Meanwhile, the British were speaking with "we" and jokingly mourning their inability to grab a pint and watch football.

Sure, this composure was not true of every single citizen in the UK, just as panic was not every American's reaction, but there was a distinct difference in the responses I personally saw. In general, people who lived in London seemed quick to ask how they could help each other and their country, while many Americans seemed ready to batten down the hatches and take on an "every man for himself" attitude.

I was struck by this sign I saw outside a local corner shop in London:

Image of sign asking if anyone needs anything during COVID-19

Everywhere in London I saw examples of collectivism. While images were coming out of America of totally bare supermarket shelves thanks to people hoarding food and supplies to ensure their own comfort and safety, in London I watched two older women argue over who should take the last packet of chicken thighs. Both women insisted the other should have it.

Now that I'm back in the US, I haven't seen a thing like that in my local grocery stores, and while I know mutual aid networks are flourishing and neighbors are assisting each other in cities around the US, I've still been struck by our general lack of visible camaraderie.

It's no secret that the British government handled the COVID-19 crisis relatively poorly, but I was still struck by a sense of hard-fought unity I felt I shared with every average Londoner.

The British aren't an overly expressive people, but they're extraordinarily cordial. We Americans usually think of this kind of British decorum as a stuffy relic of the past that's only relevant in the event of an afternoon tea at Harrods, and perhaps that's partly true, but COVID-19 showed me just how deep this cordiality goes.

British decorum is not a form of politeness that's just about saying "Please" and "Thank you" or moving out of someone's way on the sidewalk; it's the kind of regard for your fellow man that makes it second nature to wait patiently in line if that makes a supermarket safer. It's an innate sense of obligation to each other that makes wearing a mask on public transportation an obvious and inarguably appropriate step to take during a deadly pandemic.

Sure, Brexit proves that nationalism is just as alive and well in England as it is in America, and in many ways Boris Johnson is a slightly less terrifying version of Donald Trump. But my time in Britain showed me that nothing can rid the British people of their ability to weather a storm as a united people, while I can't say the same of America.

On March 20th, Boris made the historic decision to close the pubs in the UK. For context, even during WWII, when London was being regularly bombed by the Germans, the pubs mostly remained open. This was the only time during my stay in London that I saw a collective outpouring of emotion.

I walked to my local pub out of curiosity that night (I had been two weeks without symptoms and told I was fine to leave the house), knowing that it would be closed indefinitely first thing the next morning. What I found was a sensibly socially distanced crowd of people laughing and singing and drinking together to mark the unthinkable day when the pubs would shut. Everyone was fast friends with their neighbor, and even the drunkest among us kept their distance and used hand sanitizer often. But there was a feeling of unity in the pub that night that I have never experienced in America. A sense that, as a people, Londoners would get through this by looking after one another in ways their government had nothing to do with.

Londoners survive; that's what they do. But the part of "keeping calm and carrying on" that doesn't fit as neatly on a poster is the additional impetus to help one's neighbors in big and small ways.

As we're forced to reckon with the failings of the American government during this time of political, social, and economic turmoil, I wonder if we should not also be looking at the pervasive sense of individualism that's so innate to our culture. I'm not even sure I fully recognized it until it became starkly obvious to me in contrast to a different culture.

Yes, the American government failed us in the way it handled the COVID-19 outbreak, but shouldn't we also interrogate our personal inability to care for each other without strict mandate from the government? Shouldn't we consider that true change can't come to America until we start taking personal responsibility for each other? Yes, we need to deconstruct the systems of oppression inherent in the American government that allow for widespread injustice. But we also need to ask ourselves everyday if we're asking the government to do the work that we aren't doing ourselves.

In the wise words of people who have been doing mutual aid work for generations: We keep us safe. It's time we take a page from Londoners' book and consider that politeness isn't just nice; it can also be an act of radical resistance.

Travel

The Ugly Side of Glamping in New York City

Is it really possible to blend camping with luxury?

When the world is looking bleak—e.g. Every morning, after you check the news—it can feel great to "get away from it all."

An ordinary vacation to a hotel, a resort, or a rental house is fine, but it's not exactly an escape from society. Apart from the proximity of strangers, cramping your style and potentially infecting you with a deadly virus, it makes it slightly harder to pretend that the world has disappeared when you're surrounded by buildings and have a TV constantly threatening to remind you of current events.

It's no wonder, then, that camping has seen a huge resurgence in recent months. People want to be out in nature, in the open air, away from everything. You can bring all your own equipment, never have to worry about social distancing, and can ignore the state of the world for a weekend. That is, if you're up for roughing it.

Not everyone is built to set up tents, sleep on the ground, go days without showering, and eat nothing but s'mores and hotdogs. Some of us are a little too pampered to really enjoy the full camping experience. That's where glamping comes in.

There are some different approaches to the glamping scene. You could rent a deluxe, modern cabin from a company like Getaway, or you could stay in a luxury tent at a glamping resort. In either where you don't really have to worry about what you're going to eat, how you're going to stay clean, or how to assemble the overly-complicated camping gear. All you have to do is enjoy some fresh air in the great outdoors. Everything else is taken care of.

Glamping view

It sounds like the best of both worlds, and that's what my wife and I were hoping to find on a recent glamping trip in New York City. With rates starting around $400 a night, we had access to a spacious, climate-controlled canvas tent with electrical outlets and a plush bed; nearby bathrooms with rainfall showers; free wifi; a gourmet, open-air restaurant; and evening campfires with provided s'mores kit.

There was nothing to set up and nothing to worry about, and it was all in a beautiful natural setting with sunset views of the New York Harbor, the Manhattan skyline, Ellis Island, and the Statue of Liberty. It was halfway between a resort and a campground, and it seemed at first like the best of both worlds—a civilized escape from civilization. But that's not the full picture.

Anyone who cares to find the glamping retreat in question should have no problem tracking it down—there aren't a lot of glamping spots in NYC—but this is not a review of a single company. This is about the whole luxury-tent experience.

I should note that my wife and I have done similar vacations twice before. Once we rented a large yurt for a family getaway, and another time we stayed at a friend's property where he had a permanent canvas tent set up.

Neither of those trips were nearly as heavy on the "glam" half of glamping, but they provided nice, large spaces with wood floors and real beds, and indoor plumbing was not far away.

They also suffered from some of the same flaws.

This latest trip—with wifi, gourmet dining, and so-on—was definitely fancier, and before getting into the negatives, it's worth noting what a pleasant stay we had over all. Everything we ate was delicious, and the public areas of the restaurant and around three large fire pits provided plenty of social distancing.

glamping sunset

The price of our stay included a breakfast basket—smoked salmon, pastries, cheese, and orange juice—delivered to our tent. We ate our fill while admiring the stunning view from the front of our tent—arranged to be uninterrupted by any neighbors. It was easy to imagine we were looking at Manhattan from some private haven that civilization could never reach.

It was admittedly lovely. But while it did bring together some of the best aspects of luxury resorts and rustic camping, it also combined some of the worst.

Let's start with the noise. If you're expecting to get a good night's sleep because you're in a warm, comfy bed, you'd better have a high tolerance for noise. Not only do the walls of a canvas tent flap loudly in the wind, they provide little barrier from the sounds of people passing on nearby gravel paths and of night birds swooping and sounding shrill calls overhead.

Speaking of wildlife, it is very hard to fully seal off a large tent on a wooden platform in the middle of a field. In all three of the glamping shelters we have stayed in, a stray bug or two have managed to find their way inside. In two out of three—including this trip—we've also encountered rodents.

Fortunately—given New York City's reputation—the rodent that broke into our tent over the weekend was an ordinary field mouse, rather than a giant subway rat. My wife heard it scrambling after we had turned off our bedside lamps, and she caught it in the flashlight from her phone as it was sneaking toward a container of dinner leftovers. It darted back through the gap where it had broken in.

After that, we moved our food into a provided Yeti cooler and managed to get some sleep with the help of the tent's bluetooth speaker—hopefully without irritating any neighbors. While we didn't sleep as well as we would have at home, we don't mind camping, so none of this was bad enough to really bother us. But it did seem like the kind of thing that someone expecting a resort experience might not be ready for.

Glamping tent

The larger issue, from my perspective, was the so-called climate control. The night we spent in our tent was chilly, and we were grateful for the electric heating pads keeping our bed warm beneath the comforter, but that wasn't the only provision against the cold. The tent had a dual-function space heater/AC that we didn't even realize was on and running until late that night.

It may have made the air inside marginally warmer, but the tent had a high roof with a sizable gap at the peak where most of that heat probably escaped. Even if the canvas had been perfectly sealed to the outside air, it would have taken a ton of energy to warm up such a large, uninsulated space. The same goes for running it as an AC on a hot night.

We were really just pumping heat into the surrounding area. Any sense that we were communing with nature was undermined by the realization that we were basically assaulting the environment with this massive, virtually pointless waste of energy.

Really, the whole idea of a climate-controlled tent—especially with such a large space—is somewhat ridiculous. It promotes the idea that you can have every modern comfort while being out in nature. But that's just a sales pitch—it's not the reality.

As nice as it sounds to combine the best of a resort vacation with the best of a camping trip, the two just don't mix that easily. Comfort and luxury that are easy to provide in a hotel room become extravagant and silly in a canvas tent, while the kind of noise and wildlife that are expected on a camping trip suddenly seem intrusive in a resort setting.

While there is a pleasant niche for this style of glamping—particularly when it includes spectacular city views—for people who love the pampered luxury of a resort or the natural simplicity of camping, glamping in a luxury tents lands in an awkward middle ground that doesn't quite scratch either itch.

Tiny home glamping view

The good news is, if you want that view, but can't handle the downsides of sleeping in a tent, the same retreat offers tiny homes that provide the same luxury without the compromise of canvas walls. Because if you're not prepared for at least some of the discomfort of camping, you're better off just renting a cabin.

I like to think I have a good diet, everything in moderation, and balance is key. I always make an effort to add extra veg to my dinners to bulk up on all those essential vitamins and minerals. That's why I'd never bothered with taking vitamin supplements. Except for those orange powder packets I grab in desperation when I'm already stuffed up and sneezing - they never work for me anyway.

Last year for the first time I got 3 colds. Once fall hit I was feeling pretty run down. My sister, Margot, had the same problem. But she's gotten ahead of it this year and is already taking her vitamins. She knows I think they're all over-processed capsules with no legitimate ingredients.

"I'm taking Paleovalley's Essential C Complex. You're going to love them", Margot told me. "They use all organic, natural ingredients, just like you." I really didn't believe in supplements and was convinced I could get everything I needed from my healthy diet.

But, this fall I'll need something to boost my immune system and keep me strong through the winter. I really didn't need a repeat of last year. So I took Margot's word for it and decided to give Paleovalley a look, just to see what they say.

Straight off the bat, I love it that they're GMO-free and use whole, organic ingredients, no synthetic ingredients, or fillers. Although they have many products to help boost your health, I focused on their Vitamin C Complex. Two capsules have 450mg of Vitamin C which is 750% of the recommended daily amount. This made me wonder how many mgs I was actually getting through my food. Perhaps I wasn't hitting my daily recommended dosage?

When I checked out the ingredients I was delighted there was no synthetic ascorbic acid - found in generic Vitamin C supplements that only deliver a fraction of the vitamin. I'll admit that I'd never heard of the organic wholefood ingredients Acerola Cherry, Camu Camu Berry, and Amla Berry that Paleovalley uses, but they sounded amazing so I was excited to try it.

Turns out, unripe Acerola Cherry is the most potent source of Vitamin C on the planet. Their Vitamin C content is 120 times higher than that in oranges. Crazy! Rich in Vitamin C, Camu Camu Berry aids your skin, gums, eyes, and immune system. It's even been shown to deliver mood-boosting properties - something that could be quite helpful in the colder darker months. Amla Berry has been used for thousands of years in herbal medicine to help support heart and brain function through its ability to detoxify the body and increase circulation.

Maybe my sister's onto something with Paleovalley.

The next week I was still thinking about Paleovalley. I just had to try their Essential C Complex for myself. The cost of 30 capsules starts at $23.99, which is $0.80 per serving if you buy in bulk or subscribe so it was really good value.

A few days later, it was delivered right to my door and I was taking it every morning. So simple, it has no taste or smell and is easy to swallow. To be honest, I felt no real change the first few weeks. But then about a month in I noticed a lift in my energy levels. Normally, at the end of summer, I'm wrecked and need to hibernate. But this year, I feel like I can take on anything.

My body's healthier and the effects of the pending winter haven't hit me. I've armed my body with what it needs to keep me at my best every day.

I feel great knowing I have my Paleovalley Vitamin C Complex to boost my immune system and my overall health.

Update: Our friends at Paleovalley are offering a special offer to our reader! Follow this link for an exclusive offer.