Eating your way through Cannes, France

Once you've had your fill of glitz and glamour, have your fill of food

Cannes is known for three things: its word-famous film festival, its stretch of sandy beaches, and its plethora of Italian food.

Located a mere hour from the border, the French Riviera town is greatly influenced by their neighbor's flavors in creating their own cuisine. If you can get over having to order pizza in French, you'll be able to explore some great tastes that will leave you saying "délicieux" for days. Here's your guide for what to order and when.

LE PETIT DÉJEUNER

The most important meal of the day, but not the one to spend the most money on. Find a small pastry shop near your accommodations and take a nibble on the following.

Espresso

Be aware you will not be able to get an American coffee on this side of the Atlantic. In fact, if you ask for an American coffee, they're going to end up giving you an espresso in a larger cup (yes, I've witnessed this). Adjust to starting your day off with something a tad smaller and stronger for the time being.

Baguette

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While it may be the beer in Belgium and the vodka in Russia, it's the bread that's as cheap as water in France. One of these long, narrow loafs of bread will cost you one euro and can enjoyed on your journey from one destination to another. It's also one of the easiest items to order in French — "Une baguette s'il vous plaît!"

Tart au Citron

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If you're feeling a little decadent for your first meal of the day (or if you just can't say "no" to citrus flavored goodies), pick up one of these lemon pastries to start you off. There is no better place in the world for tart filling and meringue to be made and is worth trying at least once.

LE DÉJEUNER

Whether you've spent the day at a conference in the Palais, peeking in the stores along the Rue Meynadier, or have been sunning on one of many beaches, lunch will undoubtedly be necessary by the time the clock gets to the afternoon.

Pizza de Marguerite

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Remember how most Riveria food is Italian food? Nearly every restaurant you settle into will have a long list of pizzas to try. Stick with the classic mozzarella cheese, tomato, and on occasion some olives, and order one to share around the table. Be prepared, however, to slice it yourself.

Oysters

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It's nearly impossible to forget that Cannes is located along one of the most beautiful coastlines in the world. Because of this, you're also offered some of the best seafood. Though I knew little of the shellfish outside of their supposedly being an aphrodisiac, they're another good treat to order for the table and share. Just make sure everyone understand what the tiny forks are for.

White Wine

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The French are known for their wines — and more than just the rosés you've probably heard about. I tend to associate white with the temperate weather on the coast, but whatever you fancy, it will be there. There are also a number of vineyards right in the Cannes area producing the product, meaning you'll be getting a taste of the local flavors.

LE DÎNER

You've been to one of the islands off the coast, visited the castle and museum, and maybe even made your way to the Farmer's Market. However, before you spend the evening dancing along the Croisette and trying your luck at one of the many casino tables, you'll need to eat again. And this meal is the most important because it should include pasta.

Spaghetti Bolognese

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Again with the Italian food! Another staple on pretty much every menu you'll encounter in Cannes (and yes, they really all do look the same and only differ in price by a few Euros) will be able to fix the classic spaghetti dish you grew up with, but fancier. The pasta will be fresher, the tomato sauce will be more red, and the overall experience for a person who's only so-so about the dish will be magnifique.

Linguine aux Deux Saumons

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A popular dish in the south of France is a form of pasta including olive oil or an alfredo sauce and salmon — both grilled and smoked. Don't let the oddity of mixing the two turn you off. It's actually extremely tasty and filling. Sometimes the chef will also add tomatoes for a twist.

Champagne

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You haven't really enjoyed France until you've enjoyed a glass of the bubbly stuff. While it's definitely an expensive adventure, celebrating your last evening in style won't hurt anyone. An additional fun fact is that the Cannes Film Festival chooses a specific champagne to serve at all of the top parties. If you can't attend, at least you can dine like the celebrities.

LE DESSERT

You might not think you'll have room after indulging in the great tastes of the Riviera all day, but try to save room. No trip to France is complete without delving a spoon into one of these sweet treats.

Gelato

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I am not too ashamed to say I attempt to eat my weight in gelato whenever I'm in Cannes. My favorite location to try it out is Le Quirly, right across from the Croisette. Here, you'll find multiple cases containing every flavor your mind can imagine — from passionfruit to birthday, from Belgian chocolate to my personal favorite caramel. Waffle cones are included in the price, making the stop even better.

Crepes

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The more traditional French dessert is served with chocolate sauce, Nutella, sugar, and more at many of the restaurants in the area, though not as many as one might assume. If you're dying to try the flat pancake-like goodies, you might want to make a stop at one of the locations lining the beach. Just be sure not to get sand in the sweets.

Colonel

My citrus-flavored sweet tooth also makes an appearance with this special French dessert for adults-only. A colonel is composed of a scoop of lemon sorbet doused with a shot or two of vodka and sometimes a little bit of tonic water, for good measure. As long as you haven't been hitting the bubbly too hard at dinner, this specialty shouldn't make you too dizzy on your walk home.

Now that your menu is set, all you need is your plane ticket, and perhaps a pair of chic, elastic waist pants.

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Food & Drink

6 NYC Food Trends You Can Try at Home

From Raindrop Cakes to Ramen Burgers, these New York City food crazes are available in your kitchen.

Back when a world outside your home and the grocery store existed, New York City had a habit of getting swept up in food crazes.

Sometimes those crazes have involved a burgeoning appreciation for an established cultural tradition from around the world -- arepas, poké bowls, Korean barbecue. At other times these crazes have just involved particular purveyors taking a familiar item more seriously -- like the doughnut renaissance spurred by Doughnut Plant and Dough.

But the most alluring and often ridiculous food trends in New York City tend to involve something truly novel, eye-catching, and sometimes just weird. Fortunately, for those of us who are taking pandemic conditions seriously, there are options to bring some of the novelty of those trends home for the Instagrammable weirdness you may have been missing.

These are some of the recent New York City food trends that you can try for yourself.

Raindrop Cake

raindrop cake

Like a lot of food trends that sweep New York, the Raindrop Cake can be traced back to Japan. Created by the Kinseiken Seika company outside Tokyo, the clear, jiggly cake was originally introduced as water mochi. In 2016 a Brooklyn-based digital marketer named Darren Wong set out to introduce the strange "edible water" to New York at the Smorgasburg food festival, and the strangely beautiful dessert took off.

Now Wong sells kits with everything you need to create your own low-calorie jellyfish/breast implant confection at home. For $36 the kit includes ingredients, molds, and bamboo trays for six raindrop cakes served with brown sugar syrup and Japanese Kinako flour.

Cronuts

cronuts

Dominique Ansel Bakery

When French pastry chef Dominique Ansel introduced New York to his chimera dessert blending a croissant with a doughnut, it was an overnight sensation with lines around the block to try the flaky fried goodness. They were such a hit that a more pedestrian version of the cronut made its way to Dunkin around the country.

Since then, Ansel has unveiled a number of buzzworthy and inventive creations, like What-a-Melon ice cream, Zero-Gravity cakes, and frozen s'mores. But if you want to try the sensation that started it all, Ansel has shared his original cronut recipe.

And if it turns out that you're not quite at the level to emulate a world-renowned French pastry chef, you can always try the knock-off version with these simple biscuit dough donuts you can make in an air fryer.

Ramen Burger

ramen burger

Here's another food craze imported from Japan. The ramen burger has popular in the Fukushima region for some time, but it was first introduced to New York by chef Keizo Shimamoto's restaurant Ramen Shack in 2013.

The simple fusion of Japanese and American cuisine is pretty much exactly what it sounds like. Instead of a standard white bread bun, ramen noodles are cooked to chewy perfection, pressed into a bun shape, then seared in sesame oil until the outside is crispy.

Inside that bun you can place whatever kind of burger you like, but Shimamoto's version involved a beef patty served with arugula, scallions, and a signature sauce. While your results with instant ramen are unlikely to match the quality of Shimamoto's buns, this recipe should help you get close.

Ube Ice Cream

Ube ice cream

Gemma's Bigger Bolder Baking

The purple yam known as ube is a staple of Filipino desserts. In recent years its distinctive, almost floral sweetness has grown in popularity in NYC, showing up in a variety of baked goods and in the Philippines's signature take on shaved ice -- halo-halo.

The fluffy ube mamons -- sponge cakes -- at Red Ribbon Bakeshop are a great introduction to what has made it such a popular ingredient. There is also the delicious flan-like ube halaya. But maybe the most craveable and craze-worthy uses of ube is as a flavor of ice cream.

This simple recipe calls for ube extract or powder, rather than using actual yam -- but the distinctive ube flavor still comes through in the delicious results.

Grasshoppers

Tempura grasshoppers

Food Republic

Speaking of climate change... oh, were we not talking about climate change? It's always just lingering in the background -- a portent of doom hovering over all our thoughts about the future? Cool.

Anyway, speaking of climate change, one of the most important changes our society will need to make in order to mitigate its catastrophic effects it to shift our food supply to a more sustainable model. And one of the keys to that effort will be a shift away from meat to less wasteful protein sources.

Plant-based alternatives like impossible burgers and beyond meats are a likely component of that shift, but one of the most efficient forms of protein on Earth is also one of the easiest to come by -- bugs. With that in mind, restaurants like The Black Ant have introduced insects as a fashionable part of NYC dining.

You might be thinking that's gross, but in reality...it absolutely is. Bugs are weird and gross, and the idea of eating them is not appetizing.

But chances are there's already something in your diet that would be gross if you weren't used to it -- aren't lobsters basically sea bugs anyway? So if you can find a way to get over that mental block and make those bugs appealing -- as cultures around the world have been doing throughout history -- you might be ready for the Snowpiercer dystopia that lies ahead.

With that in mind, you can buy a bucket of crunchy dried grasshoppers to start experimenting with cooking. And, while not as inventive as Black Ant's grasshopper-crusted shrimp tacos, these recipes for curried tempura grasshoppers and Oaxacan chapulines tacos sound downright edible.

Hot Cocktails

hot toddy

Okay, this is hardly a new or a specifically New York trend, but with restaurants and bars moving outdoors in the middle of winter, people have been warming themselves with hot beverages. But there's nothing to stop you from bringing that heat home to enjoy a tipsy winter night on a balcony, rooftop, or fire escape.

From hot toddies to hot buttered rum, spiked hot chocolate, and mulled wine, the possibilities are endless. A hot cocktail can be as simple as Irishing-up a cup of coffee, but we recommend getting your hands on some citrus peel and mulling spices -- cloves, cinnamon sticks, allspice, stare anise, and nutmeg -- and start experimenting with some cheap red wine or apple cider spiked with your favorite brown liquor.

Travel Tips

Best Jobs for People Who Love To Travel

If you want to travel but have a job that is currently holding you back, here are a few of our suggestions for the best jobs for people who love to travel.

For many people, traveling is an amazing experience, but traveling is not always feasible because of responsibilities to work.

One way to get around this roadblock is to get a job that will let you travel and see the world. Here are some of the best jobs for people who love to travel.

Hostelworld HostelworldHostelworld.com

Translator

A translator is a wonderful job for those who want to travel. It will bring you to many places as you work, so long as those places speak the language you can translate. The great thing about translating is the variety of work you can get by translating for specific clients or just translating for tourists in the area. You can choose what type of scene you wish to work in very easily.

Pilot

A pilot fits the definition of a job that gets to travel perfectly. Now, whether you are a private pilot or a commercial pilot, you will still get to fly all over the planet. The only major problem with this job is the requirement of flight classes. But once you get your license, you can fly freely around the world while making yourself money to fund your trips.

Travel blogger

Being a travel blogger is a temperamental job but, if done correctly, it will allow you to visit anywhere you want. Writing to fans as you travel the world can be a fun and exciting way to engage with the planet. This job can be difficult to do, though, as you must be able to write consistently and capture your audience with each post.

English teacher

This may not sound like a job that allows you to travel, but schools all around the world are always looking for more people to teach English.

In this career, you would move near the school that you would teach at and live there over the course of your time there. The interesting thing about this job is that it does not necessarily require a teaching degree, depending on the school and country in question. You also get to live in a new country for an extended period.

When it comes to the best jobs for people who love to travel, these are just a few of our suggestions. There are plenty of jobs where you can travel around the world, but these ones are far-reaching and cover a lot of different lifestyles. They might seem like pipe dreams, but hey, you never know!

Seattle, Washington is a rainy, coffee-fueled, coastal town often referred to as the "Emerald City."

Located against the ecological wonderland of Puget Sound, this cosmopolitan, seaside city is a mishmash of arts, culture, history, nature, and, of course, cloudy weather. Thanks to its proximity to nature, its greenery, and its culturally rich, big-city atmosphere, the city is becoming increasingly popular, both for tourists and those looking for a change of scenery.

The Big Stops: Tourist Seattle

If you only have a few days to visit Seattle, you'll probably want to check out the area's most famous attractions.

For nature lovers and summit-chasers, there's the imposing, wildflower-shrouded Mt. Rainier.

Mt. Rainierthebesttravelplaces.com

Mt. Rainier

For foodies, there's the popular Pike Place Market, a giant patchwork of food-sellers and friendly chaos where you can purchase everything from giant crabs' legs to bottomless amounts of coffee (more on that later).

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And finally, there's the iconic Space Needle and the Sky View Observatory, which will give you extraordinary views of the city.

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Seattle Arts and Museums

For arts and culture lovers, Seattle has plenty to cut your teeth on. Don't miss the Chihuly Garden and Glass, a collection of extraordinary blown-glass sculptures by Dale Chihuly.

Chihuly Gardensfodors.com

Chihuly Gardens

For art, there's the giant Seattle Art Museum Downtown. Seattle also offers the Museum of Pop Culture, a nonprofit that features all your favorite icons from history, and plenty of other options.

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For some history, there's the Klondike Gold Rush Museum, which commemorates Seattle's history as a gold rush hub.

There are plenty of quirky attractions—like the giant Fremont Troll, the 18-foot sculpture in the Fremont neighborhood that cuts an imposing figure.

Fremont Trollsillyamerica.com

You could also take in the city from a boat—marine enthusiasts might enjoy visiting to the Hiram M. Chittenden Locks to explore the history of this port city.

Seattle, of course, also has a gritty underground side—you may know the city from its time at the heart of the '90s grunge movement.

It also has a long, storied history that has left more than a few scars. You can literally see its underground through one of its underground tours, which will take you on a walk through the "buried city," the remnants left over from before the Great Fire of 1889.

Seattle Undergroundpinterest

Natural Wonders

Seattle is notorious for its natural wonders. For a close-up view, there's the Seattle Aquarium, a marine experience that showcases the best of what Puget Sound has to offer.

For more exposure to the beauty of Seattle's nature, try the Washington Park Arboretum, a 230-acre showcase of Seattle's wetlands and natural wonders.

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You might also pay a visit to the Alki Beach for some time with the ocean waves.

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Or consider taking a more exhaustive adventure to Discovery Park, a giant and labyrinthine natural park at the edge of Puget Sound.

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Food and Drink

Food tours are also popular options for those who want to get more intimate with the city's cuisine, and Seattle is often ranked as one of the best cities for foodies.

It's also a great place for coffee-heads. You might also pay a visit to the Starbucks Reserve Roastery, AKA Ultimate Starbucks, a tasting room that features a coffee library amongst other treats for coffee addicts.

Sarbucks Reserve Roasterydesigner.com

Moving to Seattle

If you're planning on moving to Seattle, locals say there's a few things you should know. First off, it is most definitely overcast the majority of the time, though the rain is rather like a mist. That makes the rare sunny day shine even more, though, locals say, in addition to fostering natural abundance.

The city is generally very congested with traffic, which can be noisy, though it offers great public transportation options, from buses to rail—regardless, you'll want to get an Orca Card for that.

Like every city, Seattle has a number of diverse and charismatic neighborhoods. For example, there's the beachy, more laid-back West Seattle.

West SeattleWest Seattle

There's the vibrant Capitol Hill, a hub of arts, culture, tech bros, and nightlife (during non-COVID times).

There's the historic and artsy Pioneer Square, featuring plenty of museums, shops, galleries, and pubs.

Pioneer Square SeattleExpedia

Fremont is a more bohemian area. Belltown is a trendy waterfront neighborhood that's close to everything.

In general, Seattle residents love the city for its proximity to nature, from beaches to glaciers, and its abundance of arts and cultural attractions. As Kimberly Kinrade said, "Seattle is for people who love culture, but refuse to sacrifice their wild nature to attain it." Residents dislike the steep cost of housing and all things that come from rising prices, including the city's large homeless population.

In general, the city is known as environmentally conscious, liberal, and dog-loving. The people are often referred to as nice but possibly a bit standoffish and cold (the "Seattle Freeze" is when you make plans to hang out and then bail, which is apparently very common). The rain can certainly get depressing, but the proximity to nature helps.

Remember, if you do happen to move: umbrellas are dead giveaways for tourists.


What's your favorite part about Seattle? What did we leave out? Let us know at @thejourniest on Twitter!