Haunted and Amused: 6 of America's Creepiest Museums

America has a deeply haunted heartland, with folklore and human acts of depravity and evil spirits woven into our history.

Post Malone believes he's cursed. Since visiting Ghost Adventure's Zak Bagans' Haunted Museum in 2018, the singer's sworn that an evil spirit haunts him. If you can't get to Las Vegas to see the demonic box that cursed him for yourself, then there's Ed and Lorraine Warren's collection of occult items in Connecticut, or you could go straight to the Museum of Death in Hollywood, California.

America has a deeply haunted heartland, with folklore and human acts of depravity and evil spirits woven into our history. Instead of pretending they don't tap into something primal in our brains, haunted (and haunting) museums provide the opportunity to face our fears. And lucky for us, we're not alone. These are just six of the most haunted or disturbing museums in America.

Even while you're stuck at home, you can visit the museums' websites to view some of the exhibits.

The Warrens' Occult Museum

Where: 30 Knollwood St, Monroe, CT 06468

With The Conjuring franchise bringing the Warrens' careers as demon hunters to the silver screen, the story of the real-life spirit-chasing couple is often occluded. But from the real-life Annabelle doll to a mirror that was supposedly used to conjure the dead in occult rituals set deep in the Connecticut woods, the Warrens' museum holds eerie, see-it-to-believe-it artifacts that are open to the public.

Zak Bagans' Haunted Museum

Where: 600 E Charleston Blvd, Las Vegas, NV 89104

One of the Haunted Museum's exhibits, a Dybbuk Box, carries a legend that the spirit held within the box can bring misfortune to the lives of its beholders. Malone experienced a serious car accident, an emergency landing of his private plane, and a home robbery of his San Fernando Valley residence by three armed men. He blames the ancient box containing a dybbuk, the Yiddish word for malicious lost soul. Jewish mythology says that the spirit can sometimes be helped to complete its unfinished goal, after which point it will release its human host. Or maybe it will crash your plane, wreck your car, or attract the bad intentions of criminals looking for a target.

You can test your theories out by visiting the Haunted Museum in Las Vegas.

The National Museum of the Paranormal

Where: 1600 3rd St, 2nd Floor #202, Moundsville, WV 26041-1717

Also known as the Archive of the Afterlife, this destination harbors an intriguing mix of paranormal and historical artifacts. Recovered items from World War II battlefields and the former West Virginia State Penitentiary mix with funerary and mortuary tools used when knowledge of the human body and the decomposition process was still in its infancy. Of course, there are also offerings from paranormal investigations, like a portrait of a young woman named Annie who supposedly haunts her likeness, and much more. Adults are warned before touring that some items may not be appropriate for children. Visit for just $3 per person (or $5 per couple).

Museum of Death

Atlas Obscura

Where: 6031 Hollywood Blvd, Hollywood, CA 90028

Humans have always struggled to understand the permanence of death and the fragility of our mortality - luckily now there's a whole museum dedicated to our convoluted (and sometimes criminal) journey towards understanding our species' limitations on this Earth. Opened in 1995 in a building once owned by Wyatt Earp, "the Museum of Death houses the world's largest collection of serial killer artwork, antique funeral ephemera, mortician and coroners instruments, Manson Family memorabilia, pet death taxidermy, crime scene photographs and so much more!" Tours last from 45-minutes to an hour (if you can stomach it all), and there's even a second location recently opened in New Orleans, LA with a unique assortment of morbid exhibits to enjoy.

Lizzie Borden Bed and Breakfast Museum 

Where: 230 2nd St, Fall River, MA 02721

Part museum, part crime scene, and part urban legend, Lizzie Borden's house is open to the public. In fact, you can even rent and stay the night in one of the room's where, in 1892, 32-year-old Lizzie was accused of murdering her father and step-mother with an axe. Although she was later acquitted and lived out her life quietly, the mythology and mystery live on. You can reserve a night in the Lizzie Borden Bed and Breakfast here or tour the attached museum, "I knew there was an old axe down cellar; that is all I knew," Lizzie told investigators. What else is still in the house?

The Mütter Museum 

Gout hands

Mutter Museum

Where: 19 S 22nd St, Philadelphia, PA 19103

For an educational stop on your tour of America's creepy medical wonders, the Mutter Museum is dedicated to preserving anatomical specimens, models, and medical instruments from some of America's darkest health crises. As they state on their website, "The goal of the Museum is to help visitors understand the mysteries and beauty of the human body and appreciate the history of diagnosis and treatment of disease." That means displaying "beautifully" preserved hands of a deceased gout-sufferer (pictured above) and over 1,300 other "wet specimens" proudly taken and preserved "from every part of the human body as well as parts that aren't supposed to be there, such as cysts and tumors."

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10 Endangered Animals to Weep Over

Celebrate Endangered Species Day.

An endangered species is not a tragedy, because if a species is endangered, then they aren't yet extinct.

Sadly, there are millions of endangered species across the world, all facing threats that mostly stem from human activities. Still, it's not too late. Take a gander at these majestic animals, and then donate to a wildlife fund or environmental activism group of your choice.


Of course, nature doesn't need saving—humans do—and climate change and environmental destruction are threats to humans as well as animals, but if you need a reminder of the beauty and fragility of the natural world, check out these extraordinary species.



SPONSORED

Do Non-Melatonin Sleep Aids Really Work?

Objective makes a chocolate square.

I Can't Sleep.

I truly cannot remember the last time I had a good night's rest. Even before the stay-at-home orders, I was just a little ball of nerves.

But lately, it's been awful. I toss and turn, it's always too hot or even too cold, sometimes I make myself tea and read for a bit, but when I'm still up at 1 a.m., I reach for my phone and then I'm up until 3. My sister and I have a weekly call, and our small talk about our exhaustion turned into an hour long conversation about sleep.

I Thought I'd Tried Everything. Even Melatonin.

My sister asked why I hadn't gone for the old staple, melatonin and I reminded her about the time we traveled abroad, and it gave me the weirdest nightmares (the horrible kind where you wake up in your dream and you're still in a dream). Chamomile tea didn't work, nothing worked.

She said she had a friend who swore by something I definitely hadn't heard of.

They Were NOT Pills, Teas or Anything I'd Seen Before.

A company called Objective makes Fast Asleep, a sleep solution delivered as chocolatey treats. They're created with saffron and GABA. If going to sleep was as easy as eating a piece of these chocolatey, minty delights every night, I'd be sold.

What Exactly Was In It?

Cocoa contains caffeine, so I didn't know how this would help me sleep. After talking with my sister, I went online and saw that the calming, sleep-supporting ingredients cancel out any of the very little caffeine content.

Saffron, the spice, is apparently known to help with staying asleep, and their GABA is a fermented version of the neurotransmitter that's known to help you relax and fall asleep faster. In a study, 100% of customers saw improvement in their sleep quality thanks to saffron. One hundred percent!

Do I Try It?

A bag of 30 pieces was only $40, and they had a money-back guarantee.

They're keto-friendly and only 30 calories a piece, so not too decadent before bedtime.

They were chocolatey-minty, which is my favorite flavor, so I was sold. I ordered a bag to try.

The First Night, I Wasn't Impressed.

I took one piece (super yummy!) - 30-60 minutes before bedtime is recommended - but when I climbed in, I didn't notice a difference. I was worried I'd wasted my money.

However, once I fell asleep, I stayed asleep until my alarm went off, which hasn't always been the case for me.

I checked the site again, and noticed that many people didn't notice a real difference until the third or fourth night - it builds up in your system over time, so I decided to keep an open mind the rest of the week.

The Second Night Was Completely Different

Without doing anything differently from the first night, my second night was amazing. I felt calm and sleepy as I was getting ready for bed, and once I hit the pillow, I was out the whole night.

It had to be these sweet treats. The next day, I even felt more balanced and relaxed - Fast Asleep helps boost serotonin levels and reduce cortisol (the stress hormone), and I definitely noticed a difference in my overall mood and alertness.

I Already Ordered More.

Just In Case! There's nothing habit-forming about this product, so it's completely safe to take every night, and I honestly always want to keep it in the house. I'd also love to offer it to anyone staying over in the guest room, whenever we have guests again.

Now that I'm getting a healthy 8 hours of sleep every night, I feel more equipped during the day to tackle the things I need to do and deal with some of my daytime stressors. I finally had the energy to clean the kitchen, which had been bothering me so much for the past few weeks.

With Objective's Fast Asleep, I get real sleep and balance my levels, so I don't have to feel tired during my waking hours. Sleep in the form of chocolate squares sounds so weird, but oh my goodness, do they work.

Our partners at Objective Wellness are currently offering a 25% discount if you use the coupon code STAYHOME. Check them out here!

Food & Drink

The Best Apps for Craft Beer Delivery

Try beers from all over the world–from your phone.

With breweries and distilleries out of business for the foreseeable future, your favorite beer may feel particularly out of reach this time of year, especially with the weather changing. But don't let quarantine suck all the fun out of summer. Luckily, thanks to technology, a lot of craft beer is now deliverable straight to your door step. Here are a few of the best apps to help make sure you stay up to date on the latest trendy brews.

Tavour

Tavour

Simplistic and elegant, Tavour allows users to easily fill up a box of beer over a period of time before shipping. The app offers more than 650 different breweries both local and national and is perfect for those who like to experiment. It's easy to use, and their menu rotates regularly so you and your beer never grow stale.

TapRM

TapRM

TapRM offers a wide range of both craft beers and hard seltzers. While based almost exclusively in New York City, the app offers fast, same day delivery from some of the best beer brands in the world. They also provide a unique selection of beers to help you find your new favorite. All you need to do is download the app and place your order!

Drizly

Offering a stark variety of craft beer, Drizly allows its users to mix and match 12-packs, sixers or by the bottle. Their guarantee is that they can have whatever you order delivered to your house in less than an hour. You can even schedule your delivery for a specific time, with each delivery taking around 20-40 minutes.

Saucey

Saucey takes delivery very seriously. When you order with them they guarantee that they'll deliver in 30-minutes or less, or they guarantee two day shipping. Also, beer aside, their entire liquor cabinet is also up for grabs. From tequila and whiksey, to vodka and wine, nothing is off the table for Saucey.

Beer Menus

BeerMenus

For those who enjoy strictly local beers, BeerMenus features a tap list from local bars and a broader stock list from your neighborhood beer store. With that, you can make sure to create a list of your favorite beers in your neighborhood, so that when they're in stock you can be ready to go.