The '60s Nostalgic's Guide to Woodstock, New York

Woodstock 50 is no more, but you can still find traces of the original festival.

Woodstock's 50th anniversary festival may have been canceled, but that doesn't mean that you can't find ghosts of the '60s scattered around the hinterlands of Upstate New York.

The famous gathering actually didn't take place in the town of Woodstock. That honor is reserved for Bethel, a town about an hour and a half south. However, the town of Woodstock has successfully capitalized on the festival that took its name, fully committing to the hippie era's trippy, vintage aesthetic. On the famous Tinker Street and in the neighboring woods, you'll still find tie-dye, a few old hippies, and plenty of quirky attractions ready to send you spiraling back to a different era.

Just a half-day's trip away from Brooklyn, Woodstock is the perfect summer escape for nostalgics, art junkies, or anyone seeking a break from the city (or the state of the world in 2019). Though 1969 was a tumultuous time, it was also a period defined by joy and optimism, wherein young people truly believed in their vision of a better world.

That summer, Woodstock hosted 400,000 mud-soaked, acid-fueled hippies and fans of the counterculture, all gathered to celebrate love and music. In 2019, maybe we could all use a little bit of that optimism. Where better to find it than at the namesake of the world's most legendary music festival? Here are six sites that everyone who wishes they'd attended that festival can visit, if only to get just a little bit closer to that bygone summer.

Image via GRAMMY.com

Bob Dylan's Studio in Woodstock

Perhaps one of Woodstock's most famous residents is the man who wrote "The Times They Are a' Changing," and so many other rallying cries for those times. After a 1966 motorcycle accident, Bob Dylan set up shop in Woodstock and recorded over a hundred demos. His residency there drew George Harrison, Jimi Hendrix, Allen Ginsberg, Joan Baez, and other luminaries, who all came up from the city to tap into whatever wellspring of inspiration that Dylan was accessing.

During his time living in Woodstock, Dylan recorded his Basement Tapes album in a rental known as "the Big Pink," a house that still stands in the town of Saugerties, about 5 miles east of Woodstock. Interestingly, Dylan didn't perform at the Woodstock festival because he believed it would draw too much commercial attention to his beloved woodland oasis.

Image via Troy Media


Bob Dylan & The Band - The Basement Tapes Complete Trailer (Digital video) www.youtube.com

Levon Helms Studio at the Barn

The famous Levon Helms Studios are not open to the public, unless you're able to attend one of its rare shows. Levon Helms was the Rolling Stones' drummer; later in life he set up shop at the Woodstock recording studio known as "The Barn" and recorded several Grammy-winning albums there. Over the years, fans including Emmylou Harris, Norah Jones, and many others came to attend Helms' signature event—the hours-long jam session called the "Midnight Ramble"—a tradition that is still going strong in Woodstock today. Helms passed away three years ago, but his musical legacy remains strong.

Image via Amazon.com

Tinker Street

This street is the beating heart of Woodstock. Here, you'll find everything from gemstone shops to stores crammed with Woodstock souvenirs—one such being Woodstock Legends, a store that's packed with souvenirs from the '60s. You might also spot Volkswagen buses painted with peace signs, pottery shops, and the odd long-haired hippie.

Image via Pinterest

Bethel Woods Center for the Arts

If you want to get closer to the actual grounds of the festival, then you'll have to drive about an hour and a half to get to the rural dairy farm where all the acid-fueled 24/7 concert-going actually took place. The Museum at Bethel Woods contains a permanent main exhibit, called "Woodstock and the '60s," which features a variety of multimedia installations and artifacts that will bring the festival to life.

The Museum at Bethel Woods Image via Bethel Woods

Opus 40

This sculpture garden showcases artist Harvey Fite's masterpiece. In 1938, Fink purchased an empty plot of land in upstate New York; and from there, he created a 6.5-acre sculpture known as Opus 40, which he continued to work on until his death in 1976. Today, his creation still stands, bearing quiet witness to the latter half of the 20th century. It's a winding labyrinth of stone, inspired by Mayan ruins, and it'll appeal to any nostalgic or nature-lover. The installation has inspired many artists over the years, including the band Mercury Rev (whose song "Opus 40" was inspired by the grounds) and the artist Amanda Palmer (whose video for her cover of Pink Floyd's "Mother" was filmed onsite).

Image via Flickr


Amanda Palmer & Jherek Bischoff - Mother www.youtube.com


Mercury Rev - Opus 40 www.youtube.com

The Golden Notebook

This little independent bookstore packs a punch. Founded in 1978, it hosts over 100 events each year, including the Woodstock Writers Festival, which draws numerous international writers to the premises each summer. Recent events have been attended by Neil Gaiman, Cheryl Strayed, and many other literary stars, and the franchise is heavily involved in charitable causes in the neighboring community. The bookstore makes the list because—let's face it, in this day and age, bookstores are vintage attractions. And like the best vintage attractions, bookstores can also transport you straight to the past, maybe even giving you a new perspective on the present.

Image via Nova Ren Suma

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It's no secret that the restaurant scene in New York City is one of the most impressive in the world.

Whatever you could want to eat, you can find it in New York—meaning that even if you have a slightly restrictive diet, like veganism, there's plenty of options for you. Local fast-casual chains like By Chloe and Superiority Burger are making New York one of the most vegan-friendly cities in the world, but the deliciousness doesn't stop there.


Between Manhattan and Brooklyn, there's been a boom of vegan restaurants that'll satisfy any craving. Here are just a few of our favorites.

Blossom(Upper West Side + Greenwich Village)

vegan restaurant

With two locations serving both Uptown and Downtown, Blossom is a go-to for local and tourist vegans alike. They offer an elevated dining experience (and a wide-spanning takeout radius) that puts a cruelty-free spin on classic main dishes like chicken piccata, rigatoni, and grilled salmon. Complete your dinner with a fresh, fruity cocktail and tiramisu—but reservations are strongly recommended beforehand.

Jajaja (West Village + Lower East Side)

vegan Jajaja

Jajaja is the ultimate heaven for Mexican food addicts. Get your fix of south of the border staples like burritos, street tacos, and enchiladas that'll make you second guess whether or not it's actually vegan (pro tip: The nacho portion is large enough to be a meal for one person). They also have a small but mighty menu of tequila and mezcal cocktails to kick off a night of LES bar-hopping. It gets crowded here quickly, though, so try to schedule your dinner early.

Urban Vegan Kitchen(West Village)

Urban Vegan Kitchen

We get it—eating vegan can get kind of bland sometimes. But that's not an issue at Urban Vegan Kitchen, the type of restaurant that'll have you wanting to order one of everything on the menu (but we recommend the "chicken" and waffles). Co-owned by the founder of Blossom, they boast a menu that's just as edgy and exciting as their decor. Their space is large too, making it a crowd-pleasing option for a slightly larger group.

Champs Diner (Williamsburg)

Champs Diner vegan

Located near the border of hip neighborhoods Williamsburg and Bushwick, Champs is a favorite of many young Brooklynites. Their menu is full of vegan alternatives to classic diner fare like breakfast plates, cheeseburgers, and even milkshakes that taste mysteriously like the real deal, while the decor puts a quintessential Brooklyn edge on '50s digs. Who said going plant-based had to be healthy all the time, anyway?

Peacefood (Greenwich Village)

vegan Peacefood

Conveniently located just a stone's throw from Union Square—near both NYU and the New School—Peacefood is a hotspot for college students, but vegans of any age are guaranteed to enjoy their menu. They specialize in comfort food items like quiche, chicken parmesan, and chili with corn bread—all plant-based, of course. While their "chicken" tender basket is to die for, make sure to save room for dessert here, too; Peacefood's lengthy pastry menu is a dream come true.

Buddha Bodai (Chinatown)

Buddha Bodai vegan

Dim sum restaurants in Chinatown are a dime a dozen, but Buddha Bodai takes the cake for the best veggie-friendly experience in one of New York's most bustling neighborhoods. Bring your family or friends along with you to enjoy this massive menu of buns and dumplings stuffed with any type of mock meat you could want. This is also a great option for gluten-free vegans, too, as much of their menu accommodates a gluten-free diet.

Greedi Kitchen (Crown Heights)

Greedi Kitchen vegan

Crown Heights might not be the first neighborhood people think of when it comes to dining in Brooklyn, but Greedi Kitchen is making the case for delicious restaurants in the area. Inspired by its founder's many years of travel, Greedi Kitchen combines the comforting flavors of southern soul food with the added pizazz of global influences. Try one of their po'boys or the crab cake sliders. Trust us.

Screamer’s Pizzeria (Greenpoint + Crown Heights)

Screamer's Pizza vegan

We know what you're thinking: Pizza without real cheese? Call us crazy, but Screamer's does vegan pizza to perfection. If you're into classic pies like a simple margherita or pepperoni, or you want to branch out with unexpected topping combinations, Screamer's is delicious enough to impress carnivores, too (pro tip: the Greenpoint location is small and serves most pies by the slice, while the Crown Heights location is larger for sitting down).


Learning a second language is one of the coolest and most rewarding things you can do in your spare time.

However, if hopping on a one-way ticket to your country of choice isn't an option for you, it can be difficult to find an immersive experience to learn, especially past high school or college.

The next best thing is language-learning apps.

We wanted to look at the top two: DuoLingo and Rosetta Stone. Duolingo is the new kid on the block; one of the top downloaded, this free app is a favorite. Then, there's the legacy option: Rosetta Stone. For over 20 years, they've been developing their language-learning software, and their app is the most recent innovation.

They're both great options, but keep reading to figure out which one is the best for you.

Key Similarities

  • Both claim you'll expand your vocabulary
  • Both are available as an app for iOS and Android users
  • Both have a clean user interface with appealing graphics
  • Both have offline capabilities (if you pay)

Key Differences

  • DuoLingo has a popular free version along with its paid version, whereas Rosetta Stone only has a paid version
  • DuoLingo offers 35+ languages, and Rosetta Stone offers 24 languages
  • Rosetta Stone has an advanced TruAccent feature to detect and correct your accent
  • DuoLingo offers a breadth of similar vocab-recognizing features, and Rosetta Stone offers a wider variety of learning methods, like Stories

DuoLingo Overview

DuoLingo's app and its iconic owl have definitely found a place in pop culture. One of the most popular free language-learning apps, it offers 35 different languages, including Klingon, that can be learned through a series of vocabulary-matching games.

DuoLingo offers a free version and a version for $9.99 a month without ads and with offline access.

Rosetta Stone Overview

The Rosetta Stone app is a beast. There are 24 different languages to choose from, but more importantly, you get a huge variety of methods for learning. Not only are there simple games, but there are stories where you get to listen, the Seek and Speak feature, where you go on a treasure hunt to photograph images and get the translations, and the TruAccent feature, which will help you refine your accent. Whenever you speak into the app, you'll get a red/yellow/green rating on your pronunciation, so you can fine-tune it to really sound like you have a firm grasp of the language.

Rosetta Stone costs just $5.99 a month for a 24-month subscription, which gives you access to all of their 24 languages!

Final Notes

Overall, these are both excellent apps for increasing your proficiency in a new language! They both feel quite modern and have a fun experience.

When it comes to really committing words to memory and understanding them, Rosetta Stone is king.

DuoLingo definitely will help you learn new words, and the app can be addicting, but users report it as more of a game than a means to an end.

With Rosetta Stone's variety of features, you'll never get bored; there are more passive elements and more active elements to help you activate different parts of your brain, so you're learning in a more dynamic and efficient way.

The folks at Rosetta Stone are extending a special offer to our readers only: Up To 45% Off Rosetta Stone + Unlimited Languages & Free Tutoring Sessions!

Travel

So You Want to Try Workaway

Want to travel cheap, meet locals and kindred spirits, live off the land, and possibly change your life? It might be time to try Workaway.

Sitting in a house on a hill in Tuscany, Italy, watching the sun set and listening to the sound of music coming from the house in which I was staying almost rent-free, I wondered how I had gotten this lucky.

Actually, it was really all thanks to one website—Workaway.info.

Workaway Workaway


Workaway is a site that sets travelers up with hosts, who provide visitors with room and board in exchange for roughly five hours of work each weekday. The arrangement varies from host to host—some offer money, others require it—but typically, the Workaway experience is a rare bird: a largely anti-capitalist exchange.

I did four Workaways the summer I traveled in Europe, and then one at a monastery near my home in New York the summer after. Each experience, though they lasted around two weeks each, was among the most enriching times of my life—and I'd argue I learned almost as much through those experiences as I did in four years of college.

There's something extremely special about the Workaway experience, though it's certainly not for everyone.

Workaway Isn't for Everyone: What to Know Before You Go

I loved all the Workaways I went on, but the best advice I can give to anyone considering going is: Enter with an open mind. If you're someone who doesn't do well with the unexpected, if you're not willing to be flexible, if you're a picky eater or easily freaked out, then it's likely that you won't have a good experience at a Workaway.

There are exceptions to all of this. At the Workaway I stayed at in Italy, one of the travelers was suffering from stomach bloating, and the host helped cure her with a diet of miso. (I'm not saying you should go Workawaying if you're ill—this traveler's mother also came to oversee everything—but still, you never know what you'll find).

Workaway WoIsango.com

You should also probably be willing and able to actually work at your Workaway. These aren't vacations, and some hosts will be stricter and less forgiving than others regarding your work ethic. If you're someone who has no experience with difficult farm work, for example, it might not be a good idea to do a Workaway on a farm.

How to Choose a Host

The Workaway website boasts a truly overwhelming number of hosts. You can narrow your search down by location, but you can also search key terms that can help guide you in the right direction. You might search "music," for example—that's how I found the Italy location. You'll find hosts in busy cities and in the most remote mountains of India; you'll find opportunities to tutor and explore. You'll find shadiness, too, so trust your instincts.

Take time to actually read the host's entire bio before reaching out. Read all the comments, too, and if you're nervous or a first-timer, only reach out to hosts who have exclusively glowing reviews. I had the best experiences with hosts that had left extremely detailed bios—that showed me they were likely going to be dedicated hosts.

I also chose hosts whose bios gave me a good feeling, something like a spark of electricity or recognition. This instinctual method might not work for everyone, but it certainly led me in the right direction in all of my Workaway experiences. My Workaways gave me some of the best memories and deepest relationships of my life, and that was partly thanks to the fact that I chose places that were good fits for me.

For example, I chose to stay alone with a wizened academic in France. Something about his bio and descriptions resonated with me enough to trust him. (I also read some of his many thousand-page-long treatises on peace and compassion and decided that if someone could write this and be a psychopath, this wasn't a world I wanted to live in anyway). It was the right decision—and the two weeks I spent there were some of the most enlightening of my entire life.

When you reach out to a host, particularly if it's someone you really want to stay with, it's a good idea to frame your initial contact email as a cover letter of sorts—make sure you explain who you are and personalize your letter to fit each host.

Ixcanaan A Workaway painting experienceWorkaway


Travel Safely

Especially if you're traveling alone, it's always a good idea to choose a host whose page has tons of good reviews. Aside from that, a quick Google search and a scan of any social media pages related to your potential host can't hurt.

Ultimately, Workawaying requires a certain amount of trust and faith on both the host and the traveler's parts—you're either trusting someone to stay in your home or trusting a stranger to host and feed you.

But that trust, in my experience, also results in rapid and deep connections unlike anything I've experienced in the "real world." When you go and share a home with someone, you're also sharing yourself with them, and in that exchange there are the seeds of a powerful bond.

Participate Fully

Wherever you go, you'll want to open your mind and participate fully. Adjust yourself to your host's lifestyle, not the other way around, and take time to get to know your host and the others around you.

You might find that you become someone you never knew you were. As a lifelong introvert, I somehow managed to develop close relationships with many of the people I was staying with.

This might be because most people who are at Workaways are seeking something for one reason or another. In my experience, you find lots of people who are at junctures in their lives, seeking connection and meaning. With the right Workaway, you might just find it.

Workaway The Broke Backpacker - WorkawayThe Broke Backpacker